Wattlefield Pottery

Pottery for daily life - handcrafted by Andrea Young

Wattlefield Pottery Shop

Pottery for daily life.  Wheel thrown, domestic stoneware from Wattlefield Pottery.  These items are available from my Etsy shop

Pottery for daily life.  Wheel thrown, domestic stoneware from Wattlefield Pottery.  These items are available from my Etsy shop

Cups and Saucers

Storage Jars

At Wattlefield Pottery I make wheel – thrown items for daily life at my Norfolk studio.

I began by ‘having a go’. From that first interaction with clay I was completely hooked. At that point I signed up to attended weekly classes, and did so for a number of years before undertaking full time studies through further education. I now have 14 years experience with pottery making. Today I work from my home studio in Wattlefield, Norfolk.

My studio is tiny. It’s really only just big enough for my wheel, kiln, and a small work bench. I collect water from an outside tap into the bowl from my old fashioned wash stand next to my wheel – there are no luxuries like heating.

My items are made with my own fair hand. This involves a number of processes ranging from: the preparation of clay, wheel throwing, trimming, bisque firing, glazing, and re firing to a final temperature of 1260 degrees centigrade in an electric kiln.

I’m often asked how long it takes to make a particular item. As you can see from the number of process involved it is not an easy question to answer. In between each of these processes there has to be time allowed for drying before the next stage begins. A freshly thrown pot has to firm up and harden before the trimming stage. It is at this point foot rings can be carved into bowls, and handles are added to mugs. The pieces then have to fully dry before they can have their first firing. This can take days or even weeks depending on the size of the piece and the climate. Each piece has two firings of 12 hours duration, with 24 hours to cool. The first firing is known as bisque. which transforms the clay into ceramic. The second firing takes place after a glaze has been applied, and allowed to dry. During this firing the glaze melts, and the final results of all this accumulated time and effort are established. Once cool the kiln is opened to reveal the uniquely individual pieces of my pottery.

All of the items I make at Wattlefield Pottery are available to purchase.  During spring, summer, and autumn you will find me attending craft shows where I sell my work.  For a list of these events follow this link. 

Hello Andrea, I bought your lovely raku pot from Trunchonbury festival and just wanted to say how much I love it. It has a perfect spot on my shelves. Hope to see you at another festival next year! Best regards, Kate.

Kate F

 I can’t tell you why having tea out of one of your mugs/steins just feels right but it does and is such a treat.

Kristina M

I can recommend Andrea’s beautiful pottery. Each piece is lovingly crafted – she has such talent and I use the cookware, mugs and bowls on a daily basis – they all look as good as the day I bought them.

Sally B

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